Taxing Technology

My head’ll explode if I continue with this escapism.
― Jess C Scott, EyeLeash: A Blog Novel

Being a so-called Gen Z (those who were born between 1996 and 2015 and are currently between 5-24 years old), you’d expect me to be absolutely fine, with sitting with my nose stuck in a screen, for 90% of the day. Growing up in this strange period of transition, one part of my life comprises of adults reprimanding the kids for getting addicted to technology, news of youngsters committing suicide after addictive use of devices or of those being disillusioned by what they watched leading them to commit heinous crimes.

The ongoing period; the second part, would have seemed ridiculous to anyone a couple of years ago; not only are we encouraged to use our devices for extensively long periods, but we are also losing the sense of independency we once held pride in. This slow but progressive transition from humans to machines with a heart is an interesting occurrence. It was expected we’d deform into clock-work creatures, what we never wanted to believe is that we would be enslaved to these inventions.

As cities grow and technology takes over the world belief and imagination fade away and so do we.
― Julie Kagawa, The Iron King

This pandemic has been a wonderful period of enlightenment for many and a devastating period of loss for a million others. Focussing on the tech part, I see a strangely contradictory situation. Students who once upon a time, craved for long hours with their devices are now complaining of exhaustion. You can’t deny that it sounds ridiculous when one complains of exhaustion from sitting in one place for too long. I attend online classes in almost the same way I would watch a movie.

Before you become too entranced with gorgeous gadgets and mesmerizing video displays, let me remind you that information is not knowledge, knowledge is not wisdom, and wisdom is not foresight. Each grows out of the other, and we need them all.
― Arthur C. Clarke

Image by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash

The contradictory and slightly hilarious part that stands out is that everyone is being punished equally. The grown-ups probably don’t like encouraging screen time and the children, while many will deny it, believe they got way more than they bargained for. I certainly did. It’s downright tiring to sit in front of a screen for hours. We do have breaks but it is still mentally exhausting and tests have become something of a joke.

You never realise the value of something until it’s gone, hence why you should always appreciate the little things in life.
― Anonymous

I’ve read a lot of quotes that focus on how you don’t realise the importance of something until you have lost it, never to be regained. I’ve learned two concrete lessons from the gen z student life. The first is the importance of time, namely its value. Technology takes up a lot of it, more than it is supposed to. (Taxing, get it?) And as they say, the lesser you have, the more priceless it seems.

Secondly, the fact that too much of anything dilutes its true value, use and eventually results in a loss of interest, the ‘anything’ referring to technology here. I would give anything to take a week off everything and go offline for a solid 7 days. But, attendance is mandatory both in life and at school.

The mother of excess is not joy but joylessness.
― Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits

It’s funny how things have a habit of making you chase them and then they turn around, let you crash into them, and suck what life you have. It facilitates in adding more plastic to your life, strengthening the facade we have sadly come to call, “life.” This is exactly what I feel technology does on certain days. It occupies time that was meant for human stuff, like reading or talking or walking.

In the age of technology there is constant access to vast amounts of information. The basket overflows; people get overwhelmed; the eye of the storm is not so much what goes on in the world, it is the confusion of how to think, feel, digest, and react to what goes on.”
― Criss Jami, Venus in Arms

But whining is not going to get me or you anywhere. It never has and never will. It could solve problems but you are going to have to carry yourself through. And rather than focussing on how taxing it is, we also need to acknowledge how beneficial it is today. It is a privilege and curse to have access to so much while there are many who have been left behind in the tech race; people who are struggling to survive in a virtual world with little to no electronic substitutes.

Technology can be taxing, yes. But life can at the same time, be rewarding. Maybe, one day, we’ll fortunately, be able to look back to these days proudly, knowing we braved the storm of a century. But for now, we’ll content our tired hearts and souls with the bitter truth that our lives could be someone else’s dream.

This quote by Martin Luther King Jr. should be etched into each of our brains. Thank you so much for taking the time to read!

We must work passionately and indefatigably to bridge the gulf between our scientific progress and our moral progress. One of the great problems of mankind is that we suffer from a poverty of the spirit which stands in glaring contrast to our scientific and technological abundance. The richer we have become materially, the poorer we have become morally and spiritually.”
― Martin Luther King Jr.


Previously on Random Specific Thoughts:
Modern is ‘meh’
ALL THEY ASK | WORLD SUICIDE PREVENTION DAY

94 thoughts on “Taxing Technology”

  1. Hello there! This is kind of off topic but I need some
    help from an established blog. Is it very difficult to set up your own blog?
    I’m not very techincal but I can figure things out pretty quick.
    I’m thinking about setting up my own but I’m not sure where to start.
    Do you have any points or suggestions? With thanks

    Like

    1. My blog is not that established but from what I do know, I can say it isn’t very difficult. I downloaded the WordPress app and it was fairly simple from there. You create a site with a name of your choosing and start writing posts. You can either go with a free or a paid plan. I’m currently using the free plan as blogging is just a hobby for me.
      Hope this helped.

      Like

  2. Wow, this is a thoughtful post. I was really really engrossed with this write-up. You literally wrote my mind. I’m glad to have stumbled on it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I have almost given up, D, all those admires! Next week I am writing
    about the invention of the World Wide Web, which you might like. Still very busy, but it is a great pleasure to say at least Hello, thank you for liking my comment.

    Joanna

    PS If you ever want to say or ask something, this is my email address:
    nature@kitsbury.plus.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! I’ll be on the lookout, that is quite a good subject. We learnt a brief history in school a few years ago.
      Thank you for taking the time to visit! Hope you’re staying well and safe.
      I’ll keep that in mind.

      Like

  4. Thanks for an interesting post. 🙂 Some semi-serious and half provocative input to the quote “You never realise the value of something until it’s gone, hence why you should always appreciate the little things in life.” I agree with the point that we do well to appreciate small things, but: If the former (part of the quote) is assumed to be true, then is not the latter – sadly – impossible? Maybe we just have to accept that we can’t fully appreciate things until we have, more or less, lost them?

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Rather than viewing the quote as a piece of advice, it’s more of a fact, a statement. Were we not warned that we would regret not giving something due importance, we might ignore it like the majority that do. To some it’s an advice and might appear contradictory in a sense as you say but when viewed as a fact, it’s just laying emphasis on what is in practice already.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Glad you agree!! Thank you so much! Feel free to be ‘playfully provocative’ anytime! It’s nice to delve deeper and think more on particular subjects!
        Thank you for taking the time to read and ponder!!😊

        Liked by 1 person

  5. What I love about your posts is how I think about them long after I finished reading:)This was such a thoughtful and interesting post!
I do feel that technology can be very taxing and especially with COVID everyone is on some sort of technology for a good part of the day.
Thanks for sharing! ✌️

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Excellent post,D, it is a miracle how you have changed! In one of my post’s I wrote about the human condition of being emotionally the same as our ancestors, while the progress of technology is storming ahead, and the dire consequences of this anomaly.
    Thank you.

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much. That sounds like a thought-provoking theme to ponder upon. The consequences are not all dire, technology had been beneficial in a lot of ways but it’s the bad consequences that stand out due to the overuse/misuse of technology.
      Thank you for taking the time to read and share your views.

      Like

  7. Hey hi!
    Myself Jheel from Krisha’s Cosy Corner ( Me and Krisha have a COLLAB blog)…
    I have nominated you for the feelings tag on my blog. There is no pressure. Answer it whenever you have time. Hope you like the tag!
    Here is the link to that post – https://thecosycorner1788007.wordpress.com/2020/10/05/a-new-tag-in-the-blogging-community%f0%9f%98%89-the-feelings-tag/
    Sorry for the last minute change. I had actually tagged someone else but she recently stopped blogging, so i thought of tagging you.
    I really hope this is fine.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. What I love about your posts is how I think about them long after I finished reading:)This was such a thoughtful and interesting post!
    I do feel that technology can be very taxing and especially with COVID everyone is on some sort of technology for a good part of the day.
    Thanks for sharing!!❤️

    Liked by 3 people

  9. D, This is a very well-written and informative article. I have been struggling to keep up with technology since 1964 when I dropped out of typing class in tenth grade. I am a horrible, two-finger typist to this day!

    One problem that I just became aware of when I went to the eye doctor is that blue light emitted from computer and smart phone screens, can cause, among other things, macular degeneration. I have ordered the reflective coating on my new glasses that helps sheild the eyes from blue light.

    There is a price to be paid in so many ways for excessive screen time.
    All the best! Cheryl ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much! Wow, that’s a long period. I’m sure you’re better at it now than you were then! I too, make a lot of typos while typing with two-fingers.
      Yeah, that is indeed a worrying issue especially since students have 6 – 8 hrs of online classes.
      I absolutely agree and that price is high.
      Thank you so much for taking the time to read and share your views! Have a great day ahead!💕

      Liked by 2 people

  10. It’s funny how things have a habit of making you chase them and then they turn around, let you crash into them, and suck what life you have.

    Very well put. Technology, though helpful in certain areas, is probably doing a lot of damage to the human psyche. Technology cannot and should not replace the experience of going out there and just living life without screen time.

    Thought-provoking post. I enjoyed reading this. 💯

    Liked by 2 people

  11. This was so expertly written.

    I’ve been feeling the need to take some time off my phone for ages but I can’t seem to? Then again, I know it’s something some people in the world can’t afford. I wish there was a way to strike some balance. I want to spend more time doing things that’d excite me and fulfill me, scrolling mindlessly is so exhausting and tiring. And I love the quotes you’ve used in the post.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am so sorry about the delay in responding. Somehow, this comment went to spam.
      Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment! Me too! I agree using phones for extended periods are mentally exhausting. I’m glad you do! Have a great day ahead!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. This was so beautiful and true!! I read every word!! The way you write it is so powerful!!! I guess I agree with 100% of it!! I also like how you try not to upset anyone by saying that technology has it’s ‘privilages’ as well!! You are one kind and smart writer!! You really inspire me D!! 😉 I really love how you add the perfect quotes!! I loved the Martin Luther one!!
    Love, Amy ❤

    Liked by 3 people

  13. I agree D! I always think that your use of quotes makes your pieces come across as more professional and add to the post. Technology is necessary, but it is nice to have a break from it every so often.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Wow! Your observation and definition of the things that go on around you are so informative and interesting to read. Your thoughts on the “taxation of technology” are very true. Plus, I loved the quotes you sprinkled in, especially the last one. (Martin Luther King Jr. is awesome!!) However, I feel like you really missed one. “Advancing technology is both our savior and our doom.” -Olaf from Frozen 2
    Haha! Don’t worry, I’m not being serious!! I just had to throw that in there. Hehe! Great post! Can’t wait for your next one! xoxo
    -Millay

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you so much!❤️ I’m delighted you enjoyed reading!
      He is a remarkable person.
      That’s a great quote, that too from Olaf!😂 But I did mention that point briefly stating that it is both ‘a privilege and a curse.’
      Thank you for mentioning it!
      No problem at all, all additional inputs are always welcome!
      Aw.. thank you! I appreciate it a lot!💕
      -D

      Liked by 1 person

  15. As a fellow “Gen-Z”-er, I totally agree with everything you’ve said, and quite frankly, I love the simple and yet wise way you explained it. You took the words right out of my mouth and made a wonderful post out of it…this has got to be one of my favorites!

    Liked by 3 people

  16. This is very interesting. I must admit that I have enjoyed the extra hours of screen time that this pandemic has gifted me, but mainly because I was able to start a blog and be away from work… I suppose it would be different for someone who already had the luxury of spending time on the internet to be on social media or watch tv shows. I agree with what you said about whining… it really will not get you anywhere.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Absolutely, this pandemic has been a period of discovery for many but prolonged periods with too many screens is turning out to be ‘taxing’.
      I’m so happy that this period helped in starting a blog!
      Glad you agree! Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment! Stay safe!

      Liked by 2 people

  17. Beautiful beautiful post!! The dichotomy of the situation is both so depressing and a little funny. My life was also split in half with my childhood being more about reading, playing outside and not spending too much time with technology but not it’s terrifying to see how much of my life is dependent on it. You’ve really captured this dilemma so well – I suppose now the real challenge is to try and regain that independence and find a realistic balance without sacrificing all the good and positive benefits this development has brought. Great post as always xxxx 😊💖

    Liked by 4 people

    1. It is depressing and a little funny 😂. Glad you could relate!
      Thank you! Yes, I agree with the challenge being trying to regain our independence while utilising the benefits of technology!
      Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment!❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Well totally agree with you here,
    Taxes, we all pay certain percentage from our income to government for benefits of ours in different ways.. We pay that to see some betterment and improvement in our life.

    Exactly we do the same with screentime, we pay attention to give most of the time to our smartphone in exchange of something…

    But both, Government and Our Smartphone screentime fails to do the same and we still follow the trend of crazy mob….

    Really well written, good article!!😁😁

    Liked by 4 people

  19. Very well written post. The two lessons you learned on value are spot on. I suppose, as humans, we crave what we cannot have, so too much of anything ends up a bummer. Sorry to hear that online classes are taking their toll but you seem to have a good attitude and I do not doubt you will get the most out of it. Cheering for you!

    Liked by 4 people

  20. When you said the time spend on tech should be used for talking, reading and walking, I smiled guiltily. Then calmed my heart saying, don’t worry you are reading, at least on WordPress 😅

    That’s a *really nice article you wrote, I read it from the top to the end and must I tell you, Loved It!!

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Aw…😂 Reading is atleast better than scrolling mindlessly through other social media apps, so, no worries!😉
      I’m so happy that you liked the article! Thank you so much for taking the time to read and comment! Have a great day!☺️

      Liked by 2 people

  21. Yes, Martin Luther King Jr paraphrased what is said in the Bible: “Money is the root of all evil.” Jesus said, “It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to go to heaven.” When you think about it, it might make you ponder on it a bit. The apostle Paul said we are to be content in whatever state we find ourselves. Todays world tells us just the opposite.
    You speak of “too much of a good thing” being overload for the brain. You are right. I have experienced both ends of the spectrum. When I grew up, I lived in the mountains. It was thirty miles to school (fifty miles on the bus route). We had a radio, and eventually a television and telephone (the last two after I entered high school). We had much outside activity in our lives. Somehow, though, I never tired of that. I never missed the television or the telephone–even as an adult. I have worked in front of a computer screen upwards to twenty hours a day. It is exhausting, but I am thankful I was able to do it. I earned a paycheck with which I paid the bills.
    Eventually, if we look at things–as you have above–and we don’t feel sorry for ourselves, it balances out–but only if we seek a spiritual life and spiritual wisdom as well. Blessings!

    Liked by 7 people

    1. It’s intriguing to see that the state we find ourselves in was predicted a long time ago. Thank you so much for mentioning your perspective from a religious point of view. St. Paul’s advice is extremely relevant and important today.
      It’s amazing that you have experienced both the ends! And I agree, we are often exhausted by and grateful for technology!
      Looking at certain subjects from a spiritual perspective can indeed, often be enlightening. Thank you so much for taking the time to read and leave such a thoughtful comment! Have a great weekend!

      Liked by 2 people

  22. I absolutely love the way you write, D. It gets me thinking and working through things in a refreshing and truly helpful way! You’re so right about everything you said in this post.
    When I got my first phone when I was fourteen, I found as many moments as I could in each day to be on it. It was the priority, my focus. At the age of twenty, screens in various forms take up a good portion of my day, and I now long for and find ways to do something screen-free – I jump at the chance! I’m sure every new generation feels overwhelmed and over-saturated by the demands and new way of living, because we’re all trying to figure out what to do with it all… at the same time. It is – you chose the perfect word – taxing. It’s wonderful and confusing and tiring and exciting. We want it all, then we want to get away. Something else I loved that you said was that we chase these things, then run straight into them and it all catches up with us. Too much of a good thing subtracts.
    Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on this! 💜

    Liked by 8 people

    1. Aw.. thank you so much, Maggie!! It makes me so happy that they make you think!!
      I agree, every generation does feel overwhelmed and over-saturated (that is such a great word!!) by these new fangled thingies😂
      I’m glad you loved that little analogy! Thank you so much for taking the time to read and leave your thoughts on it too! 💕

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You’re welcome!
        Yes! It’s only in retrospect that we may understand what would have been a better thing to do… but of course we can’t use that future knowledge to make better choices today. We have to utilize what we’ve got and hope it’s enough. haha
        You’re very welcome! 😀

        Liked by 2 people

  23. I love this post! you really are great at writing. There is so much truth to this; since the pandemic started I haven’t felt like I have really been LIVING. Though zoom brings a semblance of normalcy, there’s something still missing. I hope life goes back to normal ASAP

    Liked by 6 people

  24. Very interesting and thought-provoking! Definitely an article I can agree with. It’s crazy – how something some of us are so tired of having to deal with, is also something other’s will crave to have access to. Thanks for this post.

    Liked by 5 people

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